Try to understand the motivations behind the new C++ features to use them better when needed.

In the world of software development, languages evolve over time to improve efficiency, usability, and performance. C++ is not an exception. Understanding why a feature is added can significantly enhance how developers use it, leading to better, more maintainable code.

For C++ developers who have not yet mastered the new C++ features, it’s recommended to understand at least one key motivation behind each feature. This way, when a specific need arises, the developer can identify which feature might be useful and then delve deeper into learning how to implement it.

Here are the motivations behind some new C++ features:

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Back 60 years ago marked the rise of the ancestor of C/C++, thanks to Martin Richards.

Do you know with which programming language this code is written:

// Hello world demo
get "streams.d"
external
[
Ws
]

let Main() be
[
Ws("Hello World!*N")
]

It’s the BCPL programming language . BCPL (Basic Combined Programming Language) is a foundational language in the history of programming languages. Developed by Martin Richards in 1966, BCPL’s simplicity, typeless nature, and portability were key features that influenced the design of many subsequent languages, including B and C. Its impact is particularly notable in the development of system software and compilers, making it a critical step in the evolution of programming languages.

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C++26 is coming, but what are the major features that have been added to C++ since C++11?

Modern C++ has seen a series of significant updates starting from C++11, each bringing new features and enhancements that aim to make the language more efficient, readable, and maintainable. Here’s a brief overview of the major features introduced in each version since C++11, along with a comment on their usage:

C++11

C++11 marked a significant evolution in the C++ language, introducing several powerful features that modernized and simplified C++ programming. Here are some of the most impactful features, along with examples to illustrate their usage:

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To developers who heavily rely on AI for generating C++ code. Be careful.

AI-driven code generation has become an increasingly important aspect of software development, leveraging advanced models to write, optimize, and understand code. However, AI is not intended to replace developers but rather to aid them in their tasks. Ultimately, it is up to humans to determine how to utilize AI suggestions. Let’s consider this query we posed to GPT-4o:

give me a c++ functon to add 2 big integers

Here’s the answer:

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Benefits of well-Designed projects : GCC vs Clang

GCC (GNU Compiler Collection) and Clang are two of the most prominent C++ compilers in the world of software development. Each has a unique design philosophy and architecture that caters to different needs and preferences. This article explores the fundamental design differences between GCC and Clang, highlighting how these differences impact their functionality, performance, and usability.

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Understanding Small String Optimization (SSO) in std::string

In the world of C++ programming, efficient memory management is crucial for optimal performance. One fascinating feature that many modern implementations of std::string offer is Small String Optimization (SSO). This clever optimization can significantly enhance the performance of string operations by minimizing heap allocations for small strings. Let’s dive into what SSO is, how it works, and why it matters.

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The majority of code executed on a Windows PC is developed in C++, so it’s expected to encounter more issues in C++ code.

Recently, numerous articles have highlighted issues in C++ code, and even the White House has discouraged the use of C++ in favor of promoting Rust. However, does this perspective consider the extensive use of C++ compared to other programming languages? In this post, we will explore the fact that the majority of code executed on a Windows PC is developed in C++. What if most of this code were developed in Rust, C#, or Java? Would we still have the same incredible user experience we enjoy today? Let’s delve into this question and examine the potential implications.

The usage patterns of Windows users vary widely, but several key activities dominate their screen time. We can enumerate:

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OpenCV: The art of using the KISS and YAGNI principles.

As programmers, we’re often tempted to leverage design patterns, language idioms, advanced language features, and well-known libraries, which is certainly advisable. However, it’s essential to put on the KISS/YAGNI glasses before diving into these techniques 🙂

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Why should you consider using the C++ POCO library?

The POCO C++ Libraries (POCO stands for “Portable Components”) is a collection of open-source C++ class libraries that simplify and accelerate the development of network-centric, portable applications in C++. These libraries provide a wealth of features, ranging from HTTP and HTTPS clients and servers, to XML parsing, to data encryption, to threading support, and much more.

We’ve relied on the POCO library for over 15 years to verify whether CppDepend accurately evaluates well-implemented projects. Therefore, this assessment is not drawn from a fleeting encounter with the library but from a thorough analysis of its many versions over the past 15 years.

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