Understanding Small String Optimization (SSO) in std::string

In the world of C++ programming, efficient memory management is crucial for optimal performance. One fascinating feature that many modern implementations of std::string offer is Small String Optimization (SSO). This clever optimization can significantly enhance the performance of string operations by minimizing heap allocations for small strings. Let’s dive into what SSO is, how it works, and why it matters.

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C++ creator rebuts White House warning, but there’s no smoke without fire :)

In a March 15 response to an inquiry from InfoWorld, Stroustrup pointed out strengths of C++. “I find it surprising that the writers of those government documents seem oblivious of the strengths of contemporary C++ and the efforts to provide strong safety guarantees,” Stroustrup said. 

And Stroustrup cited a fact about the origin of the issue :

There are two problems related to safety. Of the billions of lines of C++, few completely follow modern guidelines, and peoples’ notions of which aspects of safety are important differ.

This highlights a significant problem with C++. When any programming language permits the execution of potentially harmful actions, it shouldn’t come as a surprise that a considerable portion of developers may misuse it.

And when confronted about writing bad code, developers may offer various arguments to justify their actions, though these are often excuses rather than valid reasons:

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What attempts have been made to bring memory safety to C++?

C++ is a powerful and widely used programming language known for its flexibility and performance. However, one of its historical drawbacks has been the lack of built-in memory safety features, which can lead to various types of memory-related bugs such as buffer overflows, dangling pointers, and memory leaks.

This is a known issue that has persisted for decades, and numerous attempts have been made to find a solution. Unfortunately, none have succeeded.

What has been done in the past to enhance memory safety within the language?

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Exploring C++ Coding Standards: Cert, Misra, Autosar, and CWE.

C++ coding standards are essential for any software engineer to ensure the software being developed is high quality, secure, and robust. They provide guidelines for software development, so it’s crucial to be familiar with them. In this blog post, we’ll explore four major C++ coding standards supported by CppDepend.

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Are C++ and Java similar?

C++ and Java are two of the most popular programming languages in the world. Both are widely used for developing a variety of applications, ranging from desktop software to mobile applications, and from enterprise systems to gaming engines. Due to their popularity, many developers often wonder if C++ and Java are similar. In this blog post, we’ll take a closer look at these two languages and compare their similarities and differences.

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10 Essential Best Practices for Writing High-Quality C++ Source Code

Writing high-quality code is critical to the success of any software project, as it affects the reliability, performance, and maintainability of the code. In this blog post, we will discuss 10 essential best practices included in CppDepend for writing clean and efficient C++ source code. These best practices cover various aspects of coding, such as naming conventions, error handling, memory management, and more. Whether you are a beginner or an experienced programmer, following these best practices will help you write better C++ code and make your projects more successful.

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Optimize Memory in C++: Doxygen Case Study

When the processes running on your machine attempt to allocate more memory than your system has available, the kernel begins to swap memory pages to and from the disk. This is done in order to free up sufficient physical memory to meet the RAM allocation requirements of the requestor.

Excessive use of swapping is called thrashing and is undesirable because it lowers overall system performance, mainly because hard drives are far slower than RAM. Continue reading “Optimize Memory in C++: Doxygen Case Study”

Optimizing Memory Usage: Insights from Doxygen

When the processes running on your machine attempt to allocate more memory than your system has available, the kernel begins to swap memory pages to and from the disk. This is done in order to free up sufficient physical memory to meet the RAM allocation requirements of the requestor.

Excessive use of swapping is called thrashing and is undesirable because it lowers overall system performance, mainly because hard drives are far slower than RAM.
Continue reading “Optimizing Memory Usage: Insights from Doxygen”